What are the Best Walks in the Peak District? Top 11 Revealed

Where do you walk in the Peak District? Near Nottingham and Liverpool, you have the Peak District. A beautiful area filled with some of the most scenic and picturesque walks in the country. Of course, with so many options, it can be difficult to decide where you should go. As an avid walker myself, I have put together this little guide showing you the best 11 places to walk in the Peak District. Whether you have dogs, children, or a wheelchair, there is a walk here for you that you are sure to love.

peak_district_walk

Share this Image On Your Site

1. Buxton Walk

This circular walk in the Peak District is incredibly popular and walked by many. It spans 4.5 miles and takes you through some incredibly scenic locations. Starting (and finishing) at Buxton County park, you will be taken through Stanley Moor with some fantastic views over axe edge.

Through fields and farms, you can really get to know the area and spend time taking in the countryside and the natural world. Towards the end of the walk you will come across Solomon’s Temple, and climbing this on a clear day will reward you with a truly stunning view over Buxton.

This route can get quite muddy and it not recommended for wheelchairs or pushchairs.

Distance: 4.5 miles

Grid Reference: SK190871

Time to Walk: One and a half hours

Difficulty: Easy

Suitable for: Dog walkers, families without pushchairs

Pubs on Route: No

2. Bakewell Circular Walk (Monsal Trail)

Another popular walking location in the Peak District, this walk starts and finishes in the town of Bakewell and totals around 5.5 miles. On this walk, you will have the opportunity to explore a wide range of landscapes, from mature forests to rolling hills.

The trail itself is marked with brown signs that read Monsal Trail, so you never need to worry about getting lost on your way. This quiet route takes you past golf courses and through secluded woodlands, before reaching open fields where sheep graze. It’s a beautiful walk, although unfortunately unsuitable for wheelchairs and pushchairs.

Distance: 5.5 miles

Grid Reference: SK2268

Time to Walk: Two hours

Difficulty: Easy

Suitable for: Dog walkers, families without pushchairs

Pubs on Route: Yes

3. Baslow to Rowsey

This Peak District walk with a pub takes you on a fantastic 8-mile trek, that is sure to have you keeping pace as well as enjoying the natural world around you. Taking you through three picturesque towns, this walks tends to be quite friendly to those in wheelchairs and pushchairs.

The pub you want to try is the Devonshire Arms between Baslow and Rowsey. It’s located in Beeley, and the ploughman’s lunch served there is said to be one of the best in the area. So while taking this long hike, why not stop and reward yourself with a pint and a spot of lunch?

Distance: 8 miles

Grid Reference: SK261747

Time to Walk: Three hours

Difficulty: Medium

Suitable for: Dog walkers, hikers/trekkers

Pubs on Route: Yes

4. Little Longstone via Cressbrook Dale

This walk is perfect for those who are looking for somewhere to take their dog, and it offers some of the most stunning and dramatic scenery in the area. It starts in Little Longstone, a small hamlet near the town of Bakewell.

From there, you will be led out of the village and past a few local pubs that might be worth stopping at on the way back. This walk contains some beautiful rolling hills for your dogs to run along, as well as breathtaking rivers that are ideal for a summertime swim. This Peak District walks with dogs has a lot to offer and is certainly one of the best.

Distance: 7 miles

Grid Reference: SK191718

Time to Walk: Two and a half hours

Difficulty: Medium

Suitable for: Dog walkers, hikers/trekkers

Pubs on Route: Yes

5. High Peak and Tissington Trails

This route is perfect for those who need accessibility, making it the ideal Peak District walk with babies and pushchairs, as well as wheelchairs. It spans 17 miles of accessible ground, taking you along the former railway lines which have been converted since their disuse many years ago.

There are several picnic sites along the trail if you find yourself wanting to stop and take a break for some packed food and drink. There are also a number of car parks close by that are either free or pay and display. However, for blue badge holders, all of the parking lots are free.

Distance: 17 miles

Grid Reference: SK175473

Time to Walk: Up to five and a half hours

Difficulty: Easy

Suitable for: Wheelchair users, families with pushchairs

Pubs on Route: No

6. Flash and Dane Valley

This Peak District walk with pubs is a great way to explore the area as well as the local ale. The New Inn in Flash is said to be the highest pub in England, sitting right on top of a hill. However, you have to work for your lunch as the route is a good 6.5 miles and will take you through some seriously hilly locations.

The route takes you through some twists and turns as you trek through Dane Valley and other neighbouring villages, so it’s a good idea to make sure you have your walking boots on. However, for the scenery and the pub at the end, it’s well worth the travel. Sadly, due to the number of hills and rural paths, this route is not suitable for those with wheelchairs.

Distance: 6.5 miles

Grid Reference: SJ 984 653

Time to Walk: Three hours

Difficulty: Hard

Suitable for: Hikers/Trekkers, dog walkers

Pubs on Route: Yes

7. Peak Forest and Peter’s Dale

This walk is an easy three hours with your dog, and so you better make sure you are wearing your walking gear if you don’t want to end up with sore feet. Starting near the Peak Forest church, the route will take you out to the Dales for a lovely walk where you are bound to meet a lot of other dogs.

The route can be taken as one large one or broken into two semi-circular routes, depending how much time you have and want to spend out with your companion. There is a beautiful nature reserve along the route that is certainly worth a visit for all of the beautiful flora and fauna. Once you get back to the start, you and your dog are welcome at the local pub for a well-deserved drink.

Distance: 6.5 miles

Grid Reference: SK113793

Time to Walk: Three hours

Difficulty: Medium

Suitable for: Dog walkers, hikers/trekkers

Pubs on Route: Yes

8. Yorkshire Bridge Circular

This scenic walk is around 9-miles in length and is best enjoyed on a clear morning or afternoon. It’s easily extendable, but also a very gentle walk that takes you around Ladybower Reservoir and starts, as well as ends, at the Yorkshire Bridge Inn.

You can cross the bridge and turn towards the reservoir, where you will be met by a peaceful and very gentle walk. You will then come across the sweet and picturesque Jubilee Cottages, before climbing up Haggside and walking back along the ridge towards the bridge again. Generally, this route is quite accessible.

Distance: 9 miles

Grid Reference: SK200850

Time to Walk: Three and a half hours

Difficulty: Easy

Suitable for: Wheelchair users and families with pushchairs

Pubs on Route: Yes

9. Tideswell

This dog-friendly walk takes around two hours to complete and is particularly beautiful in the autumn and early winter months. The walk starts in the town of Tideswell and extends into the countryside beyond it. It can take you through several routes, all of which offer beautiful scenery and adventures for your dog.

Once you head away from Market Square, you are met by a gravel path that leads to fields of sheep before offering you paths towards Bretton, Forest Peak, and Sparrowpit. During all of these routes your dog is allowed off the lead, but do check for signs that warn you of grazing animals, as they should be on the lead to pass them.

Distance: 5.5 miles

Grid Reference: SK1574

Time to Walk: Two hours

Difficulty: Medium

Suitable for: Dog walkers, families without pushchairs, hikers/trekkers

Pubs on Route: No

10. Macclesfield Forest

This is a great place to walk your dog, as they can explore the forested area and take in new smells and sounds. Plus, it is incredibly accessible thanks to the tarmac paths, and so ideal for those with young children or those who are in wheelchairs. There is even a car park very close by for easy access.

The route itself can be long or short, depending on where you want to go and how long you want to spend outside. The area is beautiful and tends to be quite quiet, although it can depend on the time of year when you visit. While there are no picnic tables, there is a lovely grassy bank should you find yourself in need of a rest.

Distance: 6.5 miles

Grid Reference: SJ 999662

Time to Walk: Three and a half hours

Difficulty: Easy

Suitable for: Dog walkers, families with pushchairs, wheelchair users

Pubs on Route: No

11. Shatton to Hathersage

This 2.5-hour walk is fantastic for walking the dog and starts in the quiet hamlet of Shatton. It starts at the bridge in Shatton and takes you through Bamford, until you reach the final destination of Hathersage. The one thing to note about this walk is that to start it you will need to cross the main road. Take care here as it can be dangerous.

The route itself has a lot to offer and will take you through several different backdrops. The walk incorporates a mixture of grassland, moorland, rivers, and lightly forested areas. It the ideal walk for total canine contentment, and is sure to leave you all feeling quite peaceful by the end of it. With so much to explore, you might find it takes a bit longer than the suggested time.

Distance: 5.5 miles

Grid Reference: SK191826

Time to Walk: Two and a half hours

Difficulty: Medium

Suitable for: Dog walkers, hikers/trekkers

Pubs on Route: Yes

To Conclude

There are so many fantastic Peak District walks that you can take. Whether you have dogs, children, or a wheelchair, there is a route here that caters to your needs. Plus, if you like a nice reward after a long walk, there are plenty of pub routes as well.

What did you think of our top 11 Peak District walks? Are there any you would have added or liked to see here? We love hearing from you, so let us know in the comments below.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply